Symptoms

Symptoms of the Corona virus occur from two to 12 days after a person has been infected. Most have symptoms after five to seven days.

Common symptoms

Usually the symptoms are similar to those of influenza, such as a sore throat, aching muscles, a dry cough and fever. For this reason, it can also be difficult to distinguish between a normal cold or flu and the COVID19 virus, and professional medical care will not usually be needed if the symptoms are not more serious than this.

Others develop more serious symptoms. After four to seven days, coughing can become worse, fever can increase and breathing can become difficult. Some may develop such severe pneumonia that they need to be hospitalised.

The common symptoms include:

  • Dry og wet cough
  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Loss of sense of smell
  • Loss of sense og taste
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle pain, joint pain or body pain

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, we urge you to call your GP. After opening hours you should call the after-hours GP service on 1870. It is important that you get tested as soon as possible. 

Less common symptoms

Some less common symptoms include: 

  • Chills
  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhoea
  • Nausea
  • Blocked or runny nose
  • Shortness of breath or chest tightness

If you are experiencing any of these symptoms, we urge you to call your GP. After opening hours you should call the after-hours GP service on 1870. It is important that you get tested as soon as possible. 

 

Course of disease

How long the symptoms last can also vary. For those with mild cold or flu symptoms, these will usually disappear after four to six days, while others may have symptoms for longer.

So far on the global level, most of those infected have had mild flu symptoms, while proportionally few people have become ill enough to require hospitalisation.

When COVID19 broke out in China, 80% of those infected showed mild symptoms, around 15% became seriously ill and needed to be hospitalised and 5% needed intensive care. The fatality rate of those infected by COVID19 is estimated to be between 0.3% and 1%.

 

People at particular risk

People older than 80 years, people with pre-existing medical conditions and chronic illness are at particular risk of serious illness if infected. Included in this group are people with the following conditions: heart disease; chronic lung disease; weakened immunity, either genetic or due to medicine or diseases, such as AIDS, which reduce immunity; diabetes 1 and 2; cancer; children with chronic illness. As a precaution, pregnant women are also considered at risk.

 

If you have symptoms

If you are experiencing any of the symptoms mentioned above - whether these are common or uncommon - and/or have been in close contact with someone who has been infected by COVID19, you should first call your local doctor on weekdays between 08:00 and 16:00. If you do not have an assigned GP in your municipality, you should contact any local GP in your area.

After 16:00 on weekdays and during weekends you should call the after-hours GP service on 1870.

To avoid possible further infection, do not go to your doctor in person.